Skip to content

Share page

Integrative Psychotherapy: How therapists can adopt a developmentally based and relationally focussed approach

Integrative Psychotherapy: How therapists can adopt a developmentally based and relationally focussed approach

While we associate the term ‘Integrative Psychotherapy’ with an integration of theory – the bringing together of affective, cognitive, behavioural, and physiological dimensions of human functioning within a relational system – this approach also refers to the process of integrating the personality. Integrative psychotherapy is a comprehensive approach that emphasises the interconnectedness of various aspects of human experience and the importance of synthesizing these aspects into a coherent whole.

Times:

10:00 am – 4:00 pm, London UK on both days

Venue: Broadway House, Tothill Street, London SW1H 9NQ

Important: no online streaming is available for this event

Limited seating event, please book early to avoid disappointment.

Ticket price includes attendance at London plus video recording of the whole event .

Note: Lunch is provided to delegates attending in person.

For more information on how to access handouts and video recordings please click here

There is no known commercial support for this programme.

[aelia_currency_selector_widget title="Select your currency" widget_type="dropdown|buttons"]

Original price was: £ 249.00.Current price is: £ 179.00.

Quantity:

Receive a 5% discount if you buy more than one ticket for one course. Tell a friend!

Course Credits

CPD: 10 / CE: 10

Speaker(s)

Dr Richard G. Erskine

Course length in hours

10 hrs of video content

Location

London

Full course information

Drawing on an integrative therapeutic approach allows us, as therapists, to help the client:

  • Assimilate and harmonise the contents of their ego states
  • Relax the defence mechanisms
  • Relinquish the life script and
  • Re-engage the world with full contact

This comprehensive approach facilitates a deeper understanding of the client’s internal and external experiences, promoting a more profound level of healing and self-integration.

The integration of personality in this context involves the following three key processes:

  • Centrality of contactful relationships: The therapeutic steps that the therapist needs to take to facilitate a client’s development of a comprehensive and congruent narrative of their sense of self. This involves helping clients to construct a coherent story of their life and experiences, which includes recognizing and reconciling conflicting aspects of their identity and experiences.
  • The process of making whole: Taking disowned, unaware, unresolved, or fragmented aspects of the self and integrating them within a cohesive entity. This entails recognizing parts of the self that have been rejected or split off and working through these elements to achieve inner harmony and wholeness.
  • Enabling a client to assume personal awareness and responsibility so that their behaviour in any situation is by choice and not stimulated by compulsion, fear, or conditioning. This step focuses on fostering self-awareness and encouraging clients to take ownership of their actions and decisions, thereby enhancing their autonomy and reducing the influence of unconscious drives and past conditioning.

This involves the resolution of a client’s unconscious script inhibitions or compulsions in relationship with people, inflexibility in problem-solving, and deficiencies in health care. Such a “script cure” involves:

  • An internal reorganization and new integration of affective and cognitive structures
  • Undoing physiological retroflections
  • Decommissioning introjections and
  • Consciously choosing behaviour that is meaningful and appropriate in the current relationship or task rather than behaviour that is determined by compulsion or fear or archaic coping reactions.

The aim of an in-depth and integrative psychotherapy is to provide the quality of therapeutic relationship, understanding, and skill that facilitates the client becoming conscious of what was previously unconscious, so that they can be intimate with others, maintain good health, and engage in the tasks of everyday life without pre-formed restrictions.

At this comprehensive, hands-on and practically-oriented training workshop, Dr Richard Erskine – founder and world-renowned expert on Integrative Therapy – draws on this approach to find deeper healing for our clients and help them engage fully with their world, experiences and relationships. Through lecture, case vignettes, and clinical discussions, the workshop emphasises how we can incorporate learnings from Integrative Psychotherapy in conjunction with our primary modalities. At this workshop we will have an in-depth look at:

  • The eight philosophical principles central to an Integrative approach: These principles form the foundation of Integrative Psychotherapy, guiding the therapeutic process and ensuring a holistic approach that respects the complexity and individuality of each client.
  • The centrality of contactful relationships: This topic explores the importance of genuine, authentic connections in the therapeutic relationship. It emphasizes the role of empathy, presence, and attunement in fostering a healing environment where clients feel seen, heard, and understood.
  • An understanding of unconscious relational patterns: This includes recognising and addressing the ways in which past relationships and experiences shape current interactions and behaviours. It involves exploring transference and countertransference dynamics and helping clients become aware of and transform maladaptive patterns.
  • The integration of physiology, affective, cognition, and behaviour within a client’s unique relational system: This topic delves into how these four dimensions interact and influence one another within the context of the client’s life and relationships. It highlights the importance of considering the whole person in therapy, not just isolated symptoms or behaviours.
  • The application of child development concepts in psychotherapy with adults: This involves understanding how early developmental stages and experiences impact adult functioning and using this knowledge to inform therapeutic interventions. It includes examining attachment styles, developmental tasks, and the resolution of childhood traumas.
  • Phenomenological, historical, transferential, and relational inquiry: This approach to inquiry involves exploring the client’s lived experiences, personal history, and the dynamics of the therapeutic relationship. It encourages therapists to adopt a curious, open-minded stance and to consider multiple perspectives in understanding the client’s issues.
  • The therapeutic significance of acknowledgment, validation, normalization, and presence: These elements are crucial for creating a safe and supportive therapeutic environment. They involve recognizing and affirming the client’s experiences, reducing feelings of shame and isolation, and fostering a sense of acceptance and belonging.
  • Attunement to the client’s affect, rhythm, and style of cognition: This involves being sensitive to the client’s emotional states, pacing, and cognitive processes. It requires therapists to adapt their approach to match the client’s needs and to respond in a way that resonates with the client’s inner experience.
  • The eight Relational-Needs: These needs represent fundamental aspects of human relationships that must be met for healthy development and functioning. Understanding and addressing these needs in therapy can help clients achieve greater relational satisfaction and emotional well-being.
  • The therapeutic use of the Script System: This involves exploring and modifying the client’s life script – the unconscious narrative that guides their behaviour and interactions. By bringing these scripts into awareness and challenging maladaptive patterns, therapists can help clients create more adaptive and fulfilling life stories.

This workshop is an unmissable opportunity for therapists seeking to deepen their understanding and expand their skills in Integrative Psychotherapy. Led by Dr Richard Erskine; participants will gain practical knowledge, hands-on experience and theoretical insights that can be immediately applied in their practice. Whether you are a seasoned therapist or new to the field, this training will help equip you with the tools and knowledge to facilitate profound transformations in your clients. Register now and take the next step in your journey towards enhancing your therapeutic efficacy and professional growth.

Learning Objectives: 

  • Describe the eight philosophical principles central to an Integrative approach
  • Discuss the centrality of contactful relationships
  • Explain the unconscious relational patterns
  • Discuss the integration of physiology, affective, cognition, and behaviour within a client’s unique relational system
  • Apply the child development concepts in psychotherapy with adults
  • Explain the phenomenological, historical, transferential and relational Inquiry
  • Discuss the therapeutic significance of acknowledgement, validation, normalization and presence
  • Describe the eight Relational-Needs
  • Discuss the therapeutic use of the Script System

© nscience 2024 / 2025

Location

What's included in this course

What you’ll learn

This workshop is an unmissable opportunity for therapists seeking to deepen their understanding and expand their skills in Integrative Psychotherapy. Led by Dr Richard Erskine; participants will gain practical knowledge, hands-on experience and theoretical insights that can be immediately applied in their practice. Whether you are a seasoned therapist or new to the field, this training will help equip you with the tools and knowledge to facilitate profound transformations in your clients. Register now and take the next step in your journey towards enhancing your therapeutic efficacy and professional growth.

Learning objectives

  • Describe the eight philosophical principles central to an Integrative approach
  • Discuss the centrality of contactful relationships
  • Explain the unconscious relational patterns
  • Discuss the integration of physiology, affective, cognition, and behaviour within a client’s unique relational system
  • Apply the child development concepts in psychotherapy with adults
  • Explain the phenomenological, historical, transferential and relational Inquiry
  • Discuss the therapeutic significance of acknowledgement, validation, normalization and presence
  • Describe the eight Relational-Needs
  • Discuss the therapeutic use of the Script System

You'll also be able to...

Develop the ability to interpret and modulate the body’s nervous system (sensory and autonomic) to regulate arousal levels in clients and for safer trauma therapy

Identify and acquire recovery options and strategies for trauma clients inappropriate for trauma memory processing, particularly for those who don’t want to and those who decompensate or dysregulate from memory work

Also develop the ability to interpret and modulate the body’s nervous system (sensory and autonomic) to regulate arousal levels for professional self-care

About the speaker(s)

Richard G. Erskine, Ph.D., is a Clinical Psychologist and Training Director of the Institute for Integrative Psychotherapy (New York City and Vancouver).  Originally trained in client-centered child therapy, Dr Erskine also studied Gestalt therapy with both Fritz and Laura Perls.  He is a certified clinical Transactional Analyst and a Licensed Psychoanalyst who has specialized in psychoanalytic self-psychology and object-relations theory.  His work is an integration of these concepts and more than forty years of clinical experience, which has included working with disturbed children, inmates in a maximum security prison, borderline and narcissistic clients, post-traumatic stress and dissociative identity disorders.  Recently his research and clinical practice have focused on the treatment of the schizoid process and on the psychotherapy of obsession.

He is the author of several books and scores of articles on psychotherapy theory and methods.  His best-selling book (with Jan Moursund and Rebecca Trautmann) is Beyond Empathy: A Therapy of Contact-in-Relationship (1999, Brunner/Mazel) and in 2015, he has published Relational Patterns, Therapeutic Presence (Karnac). His book Early Affect Confusion: Relational Psychotherapy for the Borderline Client has been released in January 2022 by nscience publishing house.

3 reasons why you should attend this course

nscience UK is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. nscience UK maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

What we offer

Play Video about About nscience

250+

video courses available

500+

webinars delivered

100+

world-class speakers

What our customers say

Part of the nscience family, nscience publishing house is an independent publisher of practical, clinical-application oriented books covering the practices of psychotherapy, counselling and psychology.

Our easy to search directory website lists the services offered by mental health practitioners throughout the UK.

*Legal text here. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat.

Get up to 20% off on our new programmes

Be the first to receive ‘early-bird’ offers!

View our Privacy Policy